Scientific Program

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Patrick Walsh

Dr. Patrick Walsh Ear, Nose and Throat clinic, Australia

Keynote: Full septocartilaginous reconstruction rhinoplasty

Time : 10.00-10.40

Biography:

Mr Walsh is an Australian-trained ENT surgeon. Having completed his Royal Australasian College of Surgeons fellowship in 2011, he then went on to complete post-fellowship training in the UK in rhinology. He operates at Linacre, Masada, Cabrini Malvern and Holmesglen Private. Publicly, he works at Western Health where he heads the multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer clinic.

Abstract:

Nasal trauma or aggressive over-resection of the cartilaginous nasal skeleton during cosmetic rhinoplasty lead to functional and aesthetic difficulties that differ according to the thickness of the soft-tissue envelope. Corrective surgery in these cases frequently requires the full reconstruction of the L-strut and lower-lateral complex using rib cartilage. The principles applying to the use of rib-grafts to reconstruct the cartilaginous skeleton of the nose in each case are discussed.

 

Biography:

Dr Christopher Jackson is a Principal House Officer in ENT at the Toowoomba Hospital in Queensland where he has been based for two years. He graduated from the University of Queensland in 2015 and holds academic title at this institution with ongoing research within the ENT field.

 

Abstract:

Tonsillectomy is a common procedure performed by otolaryngologists. There appears to be significant variation in analgesic practices between hospitals and surgeons and some of this variation likely stems from considerations regarding post-operative bleeding risk, particularly with respect to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID). Previous studies have demonstrated peri-operative parecoxib administration to be associated with less acute pain than standard treatments. The aim of this study was to determine whether the use of intra-operative selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors was associated with an increase in post-tonsillectomy bleeding (PTB) rates at our institution. Retrospective data were collected from patients at Toowoomba Hospital who underwent tonsillectomy from January 2016 until November 2017. Patient data including demographics, operation type and whether intra-operative Parecoxib was given to the patient was collected. Re-admission rates due to any PTB and return to theatre rates for each group were compiled and analysed. There were 574 patients who underwent tonsillectomy during the 20 months included in this study. 168 patients (29.3%) received a single dose of intravenous Parecoxib intra-operatively. The total re-admission rate for this period was 6.8% (N=39) with a return to theatre rate of 2.3% (N=13). For the patients that did not receive Parecoxib the re-admission rate was 6.2% with a return to theatre rate of 2.2%. For the patients who received Parecoxib the re-admission rate was 9.5% and 2.4% required return to theatre. Comparing those that had Parecoxib and those that did not there was a statistically significant (P<0.05) difference in re-admission rate but not in return to theatre rate.

 

Keynote Forum

Peter J. Catalano

Tufts University School of Medicine, USA

Keynote: Nasal and sinus surgery for treatment of OSA

Time : 11:40-12:20

Biography:

Peter J. Catalano is Professor of Otolaryngology at Tufts University, School of Medicine. Peter is Chief at Division of Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery. This approach is responsive to all stakeholders and has a different way of focusing.

 

Abstract:

The curative impact of nasal surgery on patients undergoing septal and turbinate surgery for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been minimal.  New models of nasal airflow mechanics have shed important light on key functional elements of nasal obstruction.  Based on this information, we evaluated middle meatal and nasal surgery targeting areas of maximum nasal airflow as an appropriate treatment option for patients with OSA. Methods: An IRB-approved study was performed including consecutive adult patients with the diagnosis of “obstructive sleep apnea” who underwent nasal surgery by a single rhinologic surgeon during a 36-month period.  Nasal surgery included: uncinectomy, anterior ethmoidectomy, reduction of a middle turbinate concha bullosa, shaving of the lateral aspect of an enlarged middle turbinate, endoscopic septoplasty, submucosal radiofrequency ablation of the inferior turbinate and septal swell body, and nasal valve repair.  The primary outcome measure was change in apnea-hypopnea index (AHI).  Additional outcome measures included change in body mass index and oxygen-saturation (O2)-nadir. As suggested by computational fluid dynamics, targeted middle meatal surgery, swell body ablation, and nasal valve repair, concurrent with septal and inferior turbinate surgery, further optimizes nasal surgery for OSA.  Our surgical protocol is the first to demonstrate significant reduction in AHI for patients with OSA regardless of the severity of BMI.

 

Keynote Forum

Ahmad Nasrat Al-juboori

Al Wakra Hospital, Qatar

Keynote: Tortuous Internal Carotid Artery: A Rare Cause of Sore Throat

Time :

Biography:

Dr. Ahmad Nasrat Al-juboori has completed his PhD since 1997. He was graduated from Iraqi Board of Otolaryngology (1997), and from European Board of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery since 2015. He was former consultant ENT surgeon and professor in clinical otolaryngology in Al-Iraqia University, Iraq till 2015. Now he is working as Associate consultant in Hamad Medical Corporation, Al Wakra Hospital and Assistant Professor in Weil Cornell Medicine-Qatar.  He has published more than 22 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member and reviewer in 5 of reputed journals

 

Abstract:

Tortuous internal carotid artery (ICA) is a very rare variation. In almost all the cases, the anomaly was on the right side. This right-sided predominance may be attributed to anatomical influences and factors affecting blood pressure. A 67-years-old man presented to ear, nose and throat (ENT) outpatient clinic in Al Wakra Hospital complained of sore throat, there was associated medical co-morbidities (diabetic, hypertensive, hyperlipidemia and coronary artery diseases). ENT examination, showed a pulsating, bulging mass on the right posterolateral oropharyngeal wall with normal mucosal covering. CT scan with contrast showed aberrant course of the right ICA which is coursing medially in prevertebral space and right posterolateral hypopharyngeal wall over a length of approximately 1.7 cm, making an acute U-turn before resuming the normal course and its distal aspects, only a thin layer of mucosa noted over the aberrant course of ICA. Tortuous ICA must be kept in mind in the evaluation of patient with sore throat associated with oropharyngeal mass especially in old aged patients with atherosclerotic diseases

  • Otorhinolaryngology | Throat disorders | ENT surgery | ENT Oncology | ENT Devices
Speaker
Biography:

Vasyl Kishchuk is awarded the title of Professor of the Department of Otorhinolaryngology at Vinnitsa National Medical University n.a. M. Pirogov. He is a highly qualified specialist who conducts up to 800 surgical procedures per year, advises about 5000 patients at various hospitals in Vinnitsa and Vinnitsa region. Scientific work of the department under the direction of professor Kishchuk V. Is dedicated to the problems of chronic tonsillitis, scleroma, endoscopic microsurgery, aesthetic surgery, pathology of the middle ear, nose and white-faced cavities, and improving of the treatment of patients with frontal-basal trauma of the skull. He is also the author and co-author of scientific publications, including textbooks for otolaryngology for students and interns, has 19 innovative proposals, 9 inventions. He constantly introduces new methods of surgical interventions on ENT organs. Vasyl as a talented teacher, doctor and scientist, enjoys a well-deserved authority among the staff of the department, university, students, doctors of Ukraine.

 

Abstract:

Background and aims: In the light of discussions regarding possible therapies of patients affected by a moderate recurrent tonsillitis (RT), for whom recent clinical guidelines recommend a watchful waiting period, the current clinical trial was performed. It assessed the effectiveness and safety of the homeopathic medicinal product SilAtro-5-90 in patients with moderate RT. The open-label randomized clinical trial was conducted in Germany, Spain and Ukraine in patients aged 6-60 years with moderate RT. The combined treatment of SilAtro-5-90 (Atropinum sulfuricum D5, Hepar sulfuris D3, Kalium bichromicum D4, Silicea D2, Mercurius bijodatus D8) and symptomatic medication (test group) was compared to symptomatic medication alone (control group). SilAtro-5-90 was given during 3 treatment periods of 8 weeks each. Endpoints were the mean period between consecutive acute throat infections (ATI) within 1 year (analysed via repeated events analysis), the number of days the patients were suffering from RT symptoms as well as the incidence of adverse events (AEs). Trial results indicate that SilAtro-5-90 may be a well-tolerated and effective therapeutic option in the treatment of moderate.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Clinical Fellow in Otology, Neurotology &amp; Skull Base Surgery at The Gruppo Otologico, Piacenza, Italy under Prof. Mario Sanna guidance. ENT specialist at Hillel Yaffe Hospital, Affiliated to the Technion University in Haifa, Hadera, Israel. Residency of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Department, Hadassah Ein Karem Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel. During the period I wrote scientific work under the guidance of prof. Sohmer &#39;Acoustic activation in the presence of an immobilized stapes, oval window and round window&#39; Residency of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Department at Sheba Hospital.During the period I accepted the Tel Hashomer Award of Honorable Resident. Internship at Beilinson Hospital, which included elective in Otorhinolaryngology both in Tel Hashomer, Meir and Beilinson

 

Abstract:

To study the clinical presentation, intraoperative findings and surgical management in Meningo-encephalic-herniation (MEH) based on the etiology. The inclusion criteria were intraoperatively verified MEH in patients with a minimum follow-up of 12 months which yielded 262 operated ears. The data were extracted regarding demographics, laterality, clinical presentation, past surgeries, contralateral-ear condition, intraoperative findings, complications, recurrences, revision-surgeries, audiometric-data and follow-up. The mean age at surgery was 49.7 years with the involvement of right-ear in 53.8% of cases. Lesions were categorized based on the etiology as chronic-otitis-media with/without cholesteatoma-MEH (COM/CHOL-MEH)-47.7%; iatrogenic-MEHs -20.9%; traumatic-MEHs -8% and spontaneous-MEHs-23.3%. At presentation, hearing loss (100% and 98.2%) and otorrhea (65.6% and 49.1%) were predominant in COM/CHOL-MEHs and iatrogenic-MEHs respectively. On the other hand, meningitis (23.9% and 14.3%) and cerebrospinal fluid-leak (52.4% and 42.8%) were more pronounced in spontaneous and traumatic MEHs, respectively. Surgical approaches included- 1) Transmastoid, 2) Middle-cranial-fossa-approach (MCFA), 3) Combined and 4) Middle-ear- obliteration (MEO) techniques.  A total of 52.8% of COM/CHOL-MEHs and 49.1% of iatrogenic-MEHs underwent MEO.  MCFA was predominantly used in spontaneous-MEHs (52.5%) and traumatic-MEHs (38.1%). The defect was mostly single (75.2%).  Smaller, multiple, bilateral lesions were more common in spontaneous-MEHs with tegmen-tympani involvement (57.4%). Incorporating etiology into MEHs is a key-step which can be used as a guidance in choosing the right surgery. MEO is a part of armamentarium, and should be used whenever needed, if the objective is performing a definitive surgery.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr Christopher Jackson is a Principal House Officer in ENT at the Toowoomba Hospital in Queensland where he has been based for two years. He graduated from the University of Queensland in 2015 and holds academic title at this institution with ongoing research within the ENT field.

 

 

Abstract:

The salivary glands are associated with a wide range of pathologies, some of which are not easily differentiated by clinical or radiographic findings. Fine needle aspiration (FNA) is a safe and readily available pre-operative tool that is frequently used to delineate neoplastic parotid tumours. There is however a wide range of reported variability regarding the sensitivity of FNA cytology in the diagnosis of parotid masses (Henrys et al. ANZ J Surg, 2014). This study was completed to provide further Australian data on the clinical role of FNA cytology in the evaluation of parotid gland lesions. Methodology: Retrospective data was collected from patients at Logan Hospital in South East Queensland from 2006 to 2016. FNA results from 183 patients who underwent parotidectomy during this period were analysed. We compared FNA cytology with formal histological diagnosis post-operatively and conducted statistical analysis of the results. Results: We found FNA cytology was reliable in diagnosing benign parotid gland neoplasms with a sensitivity and specificity of 98.6% and 74.1% respectively. For malignant tumours, FNA was less accurate with a sensitivity and specificity of 84% and 98.6%. The positive predictive value for predicting malignancy was 91.3%. Of malignant tumours in this series the majority (54.2%) were squamous cell carcinomas (33.3%). There were 18 (9.8%) non-diagnostic FNA results, 16.6% (N=3) of these were associated with malignant tumours on final histopathology. Conclusion: This study adds further weight to FNA cytology being a useful investigation for the evaluation of parotid gland lesions. It should not be relied upon in isolation however owing to its lower sensitivity in the diagnosis of malignant parotid tumours. Careful history taking, physical examination, radiological imaging and good clinical judgement should thus be employed in all cases of salivary gland masses.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Iuliia Lomaeva works in the field of Pediatric otorhinolaryngology, phoniatrics. In everyday work, she faces a huge number of children suffering from hypertrophy of adenoids. She pays great attention to physiotherapy. She is looking for effective ways of conservative treatment of hypertrophy of adenoids.

 

Abstract:

Adenoid hypertrophy (AH) refers to the most common pathology of Pediatric otorhinolaryngology. The lymphatic pharyngeal ring plays a leading role in creating the immune barrier of the upper respiratory tract. In this regard, the conservative methods of therapy that do not require surgical intervention and ensure the preservation of the immune protection are more relevant. The study included 53 patients with AH: 32 boys and 21 girls at 7.1 ± 2.5 years old. Patients were divided into 2 groups: the 1st (control) - 28 patients with standard treatment of AH and the 2nd (main) - 25 patients with standard treatment and physiotherapy: intranasal, oral laser irradiation and ultrasonic cavitation treatment (10 procedures). Additionally, all participants in the study were examined by ENT, including endoscopy of the nasal cavity and nasopharynx; an objective assessment of the state of the auditory analyser (acoustic impedance measurement). The analysis of the conducted studies revealed that in the main group of test subjects after the course of treatment, nasal breathing was restored in 84% of children, whereas in the control group, nasal breathing was restored in 57%. There was also a significant change in the degree of hypertrophy in the main group compared with the control group. It was revealed that after the course of treatment in the main group in children AH grade 2 decreased to grade 1 in 67% of the cases and in children with initial hypertrophy grade 3 - AH decreased to the grade 2 in 71% of the cases. Thus, the additional use of physiotherapy in the conservative treatment of AH is more effective in comparison with standard therapy

Amina Mouzali

University hospital Beni Messous, Algeria

Title: Cholesteatoma complicating cochlear implantation
Speaker
Biography:

Dr Amina Mouzali is an associate professor in otorhinolaryngology at Beni Messous University hospital of Algiers. She graduated from Algiers University and has a Medical Doctorate Degree, an Otorhinolaryngology Specialist Degree and a Doctorate Degree in Medical Science. Her primary clinical interest is otology, consisting on surgical and medical management of hearing, balance, and facial nerve disorders.  She is member of   the Algerian national cochlear implantation committee.

 

Abstract:

Cholesteatoma is a rare and serious complication of cochlear implantation surgery. The objectives of this presentation are to: Report the incidence of cholesteatoma as a complication   among our cochlear implanted patients, discuss its surgical management and review the literature. Material and method: Retrospective review of 325 cochlear implantation surgeries performed in our department from   June 2007 to December 2016. Three patients aged between 2 to 4years at primary surgery were diagnosed with post implantation cholesteatoma. Symptoms appeared in a delay ranging from 18 to 24 months following cochlear implantation. Otoscopy and CT scan findings were consistent with the diagnosis of cholesteatoma. Results: Revision surgery was performed. Intraoperatively a sac cholesteatoma into the mastoid cavity with Posterior canal wall erosion were found. Surgical management consisted on removal of cholesteatoma and explanation with contralateral implantation for all the patients. At three years follow up, post revision otoscopy and CT scan findings do not reveal any recurrence of cholesteatoma. Conclusion: The occurrence of cholesteatoma in cochlear implanted patients is a challenge for the otologist. Several surgical options are reported, and the decision to whether perform a single or a staged procedure depends on several factors.  Revision surgery should ensure the complete removal of cholesteatoma, avoid recurrences and allow for safe cochlear implantation

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Talal Al-khatib

King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia

Keynote: Endoscopic posterior cricoid split with rib grafting

Time :

Biography:

Dr. Al-khatib is an associate professor at King Abdulaziz University and a practicing Pediatric otolaryngologist in Jeddah of Saudi Arabia since 2012. He received his fellowship from the royal college of surgeons of Canada in 2010. He then subspecialized in Pediatric Otolaryngology working at the Royal Children’s hospital in Melbourne, Australia. Dr. Al-Khatib holds two master’s degrees one in science from McGill University in Canada. The second master’s degree is in health professional education from Sydney University in Australia. Dr. Al-Khatib has more than 30 publications in peer reviewed journals and more than 40 presentations both national and internationally.

Abstract:

Objective: To present the first two cases of endoscopic rib graft augmentation laryngotracheoplasty in Saudi Arabia. Methodology: The author will describe the technique of endoscopic rib graft augmentation laryngotracheoplasty with video illustration. Results: Postoperative results will be discussed. Pitfalls as well as lessons learnt will be discussed. Conclusion: Laryngotracheoplasty with Endoscopic rib graft augmentation offers an alternative technique to open neck surgery for posterior subglottic augmentation.

 

  • Nasal Conditions | ENT Oncology | Head and Neck Conditions

Session Introduction

Christopher Jackson

Toowoomba Base Hospital Queensland, Australia

Title: Treatment outcomes and microbiology of peritonsillar abscess in a regional Queensland hospital
Speaker
Biography:

 

Dr Christopher Jackson is a Principal House Officer in ENT at the Toowoomba Hospital in Queensland where he has been based for two years. He graduated from the University of Queensland in 2015 and holds academic title at this institution with ongoing research within the ENT field

 

Abstract:

Aims: Peritonsillar abscess is a common and well described complication of acute tonsillitis with potentially life-threatening complications if not managed in a timely and adequate manner. Global epidemiological studies have painted an emerging picture of increasing antimicrobial resistance patterns. The aim of this study was to characterise the epidemiology, management, outcomes and microbial flora and resistance patterns of peritonsillar collections at a large regional hospital in Queensland which services both rural and remote communities. Methodology: Retrospective data was collected from patients diagnosed with peritonsillar abscess at Toowoomba Hospital Queensland from January 2013 to September 2017. Patient demographics, pre-hospital disease course, management, complications and abscess aspirate cultures and sensitivities were collected. Results: 90 patients were diagnosed and treated for peritonsillar abscess via simple drainage during this period. The average patient age was 28.5 years with a male to female predominance of 1.4:1. The average length of odynophagia prior to presentation was 5.7 days. Culture results were obtained from 82% of patients with the most common organisms being streptococcal species in 43% of aspirates followed by mixed anaerobic bacteria (16%). Of the 90% of streptococcal isolates for which sensitivities were available, all 100% were penicillin sensitive. 8% (N=7) of patients required repeat needle drainage during admission and 4 (4.4%) proceeded to quinsy tonsillectomy. There were no surgical complications documented. One patient in the series presented with acute airway emergency requiring cricothyroidotomy and temporary tracheostomy. Conclusion: This study confirms effective management of peritonsillar collection can be achieved via simple drainage with penicillin as a first line antimicrobial agent. The bacteriology and resistance patterns in this series are consistent with previous studies involving international centres.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Masyita Gaffar is an otology consultant in the Hasanuddin teaching hospital and lecturer in education institution medical Faculty of Hasanuddin University. She   has work as a medical specialist and doing research on genetics and hearing in Indonesian ethnics.

 

 

Abstract:

Approximately one to two new-borns per one thousand new-borns have moderate, severe or profound hearing loss. Unfortunately, hearing loss often is not detected until a child is 2,3 or even 4 years old. For children with moderate or unilateral hearing loss, it was not unusual to find that they weren’t identified as hard of hearing until kindergarten. We report four out of 94 students (4,25%) of the special school for Deaf in Makassar, Indonesia with moderate sensorineural hearing loss.  One of four students fitted of hearing aid for 10 years old and can speak fluently and most of his speech is understandable, but still use sign language if he talks to other students. Three of them never fitted hearing aid and one of them with bilateral moderate sensorineural can speak fluently and more of her speech is understandable, but she prefers use sign language to communicate with friends and teachers. Two of them use sign language but still try to speak to normal people even though more of their speech is difficult to understand but still have a few understandable words. It is well established that children with moderate hearing loss can develop better hearing and speech if they have early amplification and undergo speech therapy (rehabilitation). The failure to identify hearing loss at a young age can have serious implications for a child’s speech.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Clinical Fellow in Otology, Neurotology &amp; Skull Base Surgery at The Gruppo Otologico, Piacenza, Italy under Prof. Mario Sanna guidance. ENT specialist at Hillel Yaffe Hospital, Affiliated to the Technion University in Haifa, Hadera, Israel. Residency of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Department, Hadassah Ein Karem Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel. During the period I wrote scientific work under the guidance of prof. Sohmer &#39; Acoustic activation in the presence of an immobilized stapes, oval window and round window&#39; Residency of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Department at Sheba Hospital. During the period I accepted the Tel Hashomer Award of Honourable Resident. Internship at Beilinson Hospital, which included elective in Otorhinolaryngology both in Tel Hashomer, Meir and Beilinson.

 

Abstract:

Objective: To describe the surgical technique of drill canaplasty for exostosis and osteoma and to evaluate our results. To propose a new grading system for external auditory canal stenosis (EACS).

Subjects and Methods: Two hundred seventeen patients (256 ears) with exostosis or osteoma were included in the study. Surgical and audiological parameters were evaluated. Results: Mean age was 51.5 (13.41) years. One hundred sixty-nine cases were men and 48 women. Two hundred forty-three (95%) cases were exostosis and 13 (5%) were osteomas. According to the proposed grading system, 81% ears had severe or complete stenosis. Seventy-eight (30.5%) ears had a concurrent diagnosis of otosclerosis. Retroauricular approach was used in 245 (95.7%). Intraoperative complications included tympanic membrane (TM) perforation seen in four (2%) and mastoid cell exposure in two (1%). Postoperative stenosis/prolonged healing was seen in 11 (4%) patients and required revision in seven cases. Audiologic analysis available for 153 ears-showed the mean change in air-bone gaps (ABG) of 2.18 dB, pure tone averages (PTA) bone conduction BC (0.5–4 kHz) of 0.3 db. Mean healing rate was available for 246 (96.1%) patients and was found to be 6.35 (4–16) weeks. Conclusion: A systematically performed drill canalplasty via retroauricular approach, as described in this article, yields excellent postoperative outcomes as seen in our series. Notably, one-third of exostoses patients in this series, also suffered from otosclerosis. The proposed grading system for EACS enables the surgeon to objectively stage the disease.

 

 

Speaker
Biography:

Nova Audrey Luetta Pieter is an Otorhinolaryngology specialist and lecturer both in hospital and education institution. Focusing work in head and neck oncology of Department of Otorhinolaryngology Hasanuddin University.

 

 

Abstract:

This research aimed to obtain the profile levels of Ig A (VCA-p18+EBNA1) and the viral load (VL) in the relatives of the NPC patients with a positive EBV. The research design was a cross-sectional design which was analytically observational. The total samples comprised 50 relatives of the NPC patients who had been chosen using the consecutive sampling technique and had been treated in Dr Wahidin Sudirohusodo Hospital. The univariant and bivariat analyses, as well as the ‘t test’ were used to measure and to find out the correlation between the level of Ig (VCA-p18+EBNA1) and the VL. The research results indicated that 28% of the NPC patients were female with the average age of 31,12 +/- 11,91 years. Meanwhile, 68% of the NPC patients were the siblings of the NPC patients, and 58% were of the Bugis origins. For the distribution of the NPC risks, the samples were categorized into three groups: the NPC high risk group, the NPC intermediate risk group and the NPC low risk group - the NPC intermediate risk group was the largest in number (50%). The result also revealed that the correlation between the level of the Ig A (VCA-p18+EBNA1) and the level of VL was very significant (p=0,337). About 16% of the NPC high risk group were still normal though they had to be cautious. Statistically, the Pearson correlation analysis revealed a correlation but not significant.

 

 

Speaker
Biography:

 

Nani Iriani Djufri is a senior consultant of oncology, head and neck in Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Hasanuddin University.  She works both in the hospital and teaching in the medical faculty of Hasanuddin university

Abstract:

The objective of the study is to analyze the role of HLA-A2 expression gene polymorphism of CYP2E1, and nitrosamine in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patient. The data were taken from 70 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients who came for treatment at two tertiary referral hospitals Dr. Wahidin Sudirohusodo and Pelamonia Hospitals in cross-sectional way for one year. The expression of HLA-A2 was examined with immunohistochemical method, CYP2E1 Gene genotype with Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP), and nitrosamine with Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (LCMS/MS). The data were analysed with SPSS 20 statistical tests and chi-square. The study indicates no significant relationship between the expressions of HLA-A2 positive and the degree of NPC (OR 1.2; CI: 0.25-5.5: p:0.554). it is also found that no significant association between the genotype CT CYP2E1 gene and the degree of NPC (OR 3.8; CI: 0.76-18.85: p=0.079), also no correlation between nitrosamine detected and the degree of NPC (OR 2.6; CI: 0.82-8.03: p=0.088). however, a significant correlation exists between the genotype CT CYP2E1 gene nitrosamines and the degree of NPC (OR 7.2; CI: 1.08-47.96).

 

Patrick Walsh

Dr. Patrick Walsh Ear, Nose and Throat clinic, Australia

Title: Expectations: How are they generated and how do they become unreasonable?

Time : 13:40-14:05

Speaker
Biography:

Mr Walsh completed his Royal Australasian College of Surgeons fellowship in Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery in 2011, He then went on to complete post-fellowship training in the UK in rhinology. He is the chair of the Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Oncology Team at Western Health, Victoria, and is a member of the Victorian Regional Training Subcommittee (Otolaryngology) of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. He also works in private practice in Melbourne, specializing in cosmetic and functional rhinoplasty.

 

 

Abstract:

The expectations held by a patient about the results of any procedure are influenced by a multitude of factors; the personal traits of the patient themselves, their social background, the surgeon, and the society in which they operate. Unreasonable expectations are unlikely to be limited simply to the instance of one procedure, but are likely to extend to other interactions, and an exploration of the patient in their social context is necessary to avoid disappointment and misunderstanding. How does the surgeon avoid generating unreasonable expectations and how are warning signs of their presence elicited in an unavoidably brief consultation?

 

Speaker
Biography:

Abdul Qadar Punagi has his expertise in rhinology and passion in research related nose disease and allergy. He is recently chairman of division of rhinology and Head of Department   t of ORL Hasanuddin University. He has built all the work as rhinologist and ORL after year experience in the hospital, teaching and administration both in the hospital and education institution.

 

Abstract:

This research aimed to find out the effect of the treatment therapy of the additional vitamin D on the levels of specific IgE of the patients with alergic rhinitis. The research was an experimental research with the design of pre-and post-tes of control group design. The research involved 40 patients with allergic trhinitis, who were divided into 2 groups. Group I consisting of 20 patients were treated with intranasal spray fluticasone therapy and vitamin D of 2x400IU for 21 days, and Group II consisting of 20 patients were only treated with intranasal spray fluticasone for 21 days. The levels of the calciferol and IgE of specific Der p of both groups of patients were examined before and after the therapy. The examination of the calciferol and IgE specific Der p using ALISA method. From the analysis of the subject demography of the research in each group did not showed any significant difference (p>0.05) based on the gender and age of the patients. The result of Mann-Whitney analysis revealed a significant change difference (p>0.05) between the two groups, that is, the level of IgE specific Der p showed greater decrease in the group receiving vitamin D compared to the group not receiving vitamin D.